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Science: Decaffeinated coffee linked with reduced risk of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS)

A report published this year by the Federation of European Nutrition Societies (FENS) in Ireland entitled 'Coffee and Metabolic Syndrome: A review of the latest research' suggests coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of Metabolic Syndrome.

What is Metabolic Syndrome (MetS)?

MetS is a combination of diabetes, high blood pressure (hypertension) and obesity. It puts you at greater risk of getting coronary heart disease, stroke and other conditions that affect the blood vessels - a condition which is estimated to affect more than one billion people across the globe.

This new report discusses the association between moderate coffee consumption (both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee) and a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and highlights the potential role of coffee consumption in reducing the risk of developing MetS.

How was the Study carried out?

  • Assistant Professor Giuseppe Grosso reviewed his own scientific research on the association between coffee consumption and MetS in Polish and Italian cohorts
  • The study explored the potential mechanistic perspectives behind the inverse association and suggests that polyphenols contained in coffee may be involved in the inverse association, specifically phenolic acids and flavonoids.
  • Associate Professor Estefania Toledo reviewed meta-analyses considering associations between coffee consumption and MetS and discussed work in a Mediterranean cohort involving 22,000 people and specifically considered both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.
  • The study concluded that moderate coffee consumption (1-4 cups per day) was associated with reduced risk of MetS, whilst higher intakes were not, for both regular and decaffeinated coffee.

What were the main conclusions of the Study?

  • The study suggests that drinking 1-4 cups of coffee per day is associated with a reduced risk of MetS in observational studies.
  • Specific conditions of MetS - namely type 2 diabetes and hypertension - are also inversely associated with coffee consumption – for both men and women
  • A moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may be associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome.
  • However, further research is required to better understand the mechanisms involved in the association, though the importance of polyphenols and hydroxycinnamic acids have been highlighted.

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